Find Your Purpose In Life with a Vision Statement

Until I found my purpose in life, my life wasn’t really working.

I was passed over for promotions four times in three years. Every time, a peer became my boss.

My wife hated me. Whatever I did, it just made things worse.

My brother told me I’d been complaining about for five years: “Do something about it or quit complaining.”

He’d rung my bell. I wasn’t a complainer. I was a man of action.

Wasn’t I?

He pointed out the story I’d shared with him five years prior. When I told him that previous story, I’d been sitting in that same green mini-van, after a day at that same job, on the driveway of that same red brick house next to a lake.

My first instincts just perpetuated the problem.

I did what any Berkeley grad might do: I took more classes and read more books.

It turned out all that education is what got me to the point where I was passed over at work and miserable at home.

When I took new actions, I got new results.

When I started spending real money on therapists, counselors, coaches, doctors, attorneys, and immersive experiential programs, some things became clear to me.

  • The quality of relationships in my life had been terrible for years, since my childhood. It turns out my dad was right: I did get a psychology degree to figure out my messed up family!
  • Despite nearly $100,000 in grad school, where they assigned us to do a team project in every course, and a career where every initiative staffing plan was described as a team, I’d never committed to putting teams to work or to be a leader in any meaningful way.

I saw what had been holding me back.

After spending $10s of thousands of dollars, I realized I’d been going through the motions in my career and in my life. I’d been along for the ride, just doing my job. I hadn’t committed to much of anything.

I found my purpose in life and my life changed.

When I committed to creating fantastic relationships and high-performing teams in every area of my life that mattered to me, my life turned around. I lost 50 pounds, was trained for my first two marathons by an amazing woman who inspires me to this day, became a triathlete for fun, brought my allergies and autoimmunity under control, got promoted, and was picked to lead teams. Now Lori and I ride a tandem bike for weeks at a time. We’ve even ridden five hours uphill in a desert, and no one got off in tears or refused to ever speak to the other again.

My relationships and teams work today because I got clear that my purpose in life is to create a world that works for everyone, with no one left out. I’ve seen that begins with fantastic relationships and high-performing teams.

I intend to help 10,000 people bring success as they define it to their lives, teams, families, and communities, and I intend to retire myself from my full-time job and travel half-time by doing so.

You can find your purpose in life too.

The exercises that follow will give you a taste of how you might find your own purpose in life. Writing a vision statement is one step of eleven that can help you do so.

If you enjoy writing a vision statement, click one of the images below and download your own Personal Purpose Blueprint, so you can find your purpose in life too.

Practice: Use these exercises to begin finding your purpose in life by writing a vision statement.

  • End the confusion and create clarity about what you really want.
  • Stop being frustrated in your attempts to get what you want.
  • See one of the tools great athletes and high achieving leaders use to define THEIR best results.

Define your purpose clearly

or lose control of your results

Find your purpose in life. Clarify your purpose and align your priorities so you can confidently focus on your key priorities in every situation.
Find your purpose in life. Clarify your purpose and align your priorities so you can confidently focus on your key priorities in every situation.

Since you’re here, you probably already read the background to this assignment. The key takeaway: it’s critical to know where you’re going. Either way, you’ll get somewhere, but without a clear purpose, it may not be where you want to be.

If you need more inspiration about this, or you just want the full experience, go read the first part of this assignment. Don’t worry, the page will open in a new tab, and there’s a link back also! You’ll have two ways to get back here.

If you’re already fired up, or you just want to start work:

Write A Vision Statement and Find Your Purpose in Life

Instructions To Write Your Vision Statement(s):

Get Comfortable

Schedule an uninterrupted time and place where you can relax.

  • Find a nice, comfortable place, and seating position.
  • Maybe grab yourself a nice, warm (or cold), relaxing beverage.
  • Choose your favorite writing tool(s).
Create a comfortable environment. Apple devices photo from pixabay.com via pixels.com
Create a comfortable environment and write

Do This

Write for 10 minutes each, on the writing cues below. Follow these guidelines.

Free Write
  • Set a timer for 10 minutes. Start writing or typing after you start the timer and do not stop writing or typing until after the timer expires. Fingers keep moving even if you don’t know what to write. If you’re really stuck, write “I don’t know what to write” repeatedly until a new idea surfaces. I promise, it won’t take long (you’ll have a new idea before you’ve written the sentence TWICE).
  • Spelling, grammar, and punctuation are not important. The un-edited output of your unconstrained imagination is what we want.
Visualize
  • Write from YOUR point of view and YOUR ideas, not what “they’ve” told you or you believe someone else wants to hear. No judgments: just let it fly.
  • This is an individual brainstorming activity, so “reality orientation” isn’t useful here (if you are interested, see more about this under “More Information” below). At this stage, think of yourself as if you are Leonardo DaVinci inventing the submarine or Dick Tracy using a smartphone, centuries, and decades before they were actually created. (for another description of this activity, and more sample questions, see this article: “The two-hour rule: taking time to think”, linked below.)
  • Write vividly, in the present tense, as though you’re standing in the future, and what you’re describing already exists.
  • The most important thing is your unconstrained thinking about what’s most desirable to you. Don’t edit, just write.
  • Write in detail. Describe events, locations, people, places, activities. Use your senses. What do you see, hear, smell, feel, and taste?
  • Finish whatever thoughts you still have in mind after the timer expires. Continue writing until you’ve exhausted ideas. You may write 10 minutes 2 seconds, or you may write 29 minutes. Exhaust your ideas.
Have Fun
  • Have fun with it! Begin when you start the 10-minute timer. Do not stop writing or typing until the timer runs out or you run out of things to write, whichever comes LATER. 
  • You may want to take a break between each 10-minute writing block, as writing all in a row may be tiring. However, if you are up to it, you can write at any time, or in any sequence you like.
Lori rejoices after a small victory.
Have fun!

Cues

Cue 1: Your Perfect World

Write your vision statement to clearly define your purpose for a perfect world, from your point of view. How do different countries, societies, cultures, religions, and beliefs interact and manage the resources available to us? 

Cue 2: What You Love

Describe your passions, the things you love, and things you’ve always wanted to do. Later, expand this into a Bucket List.

Cue 3: Your Purpose in Life

Write your vision statement to clearly define your purpose for your perfect life. This is you, standing in the future, having achieved your most important goal.

“Describe your perfect day, week, month, and annual cycle (your perfect lifestyle), as YOU define it. Think King or Queen for a day (for life).” 

Now, think of a three-word (or fewer) brand promise for the difference you make, (such as, “World That Works” or “No More Toil” or “Everyone Gets Along” (but don’t get stuck on this goal — just consider it for a moment — you will improve it over time until you find the perfect label).

Find your purpose in life. Clarify your purpose and align your priorities so you can confidently focus on your key priorities in every situation.
Find your purpose in life. Clarify your purpose and align your priorities so you can confidently focus on your key priorities in every situation.

Cue 4: Your Perfect Job

Write your vision statement to clearly define your purpose for your perfect job.

“Describe your perfect workday, week, month, and annual cycle (your perfect work-life), as YOU define it. Think I’m the Boss, I love my job, I do what I want, and I make all the money I want.” This is you, standing in the future, working in the job you love.

Next, think of a three-word (or fewer) brand promise for the services or products you offer, (such as, “I paint houses” or “the ultimate analyst” or “writes cool code” (but don’t get stuck on this goal — just consider it for a moment — you will improve it over time until you find the perfect label).

Cue 5: Your Perfect Product

Write your vision statement to clearly define your purpose for your perfect product. Describe the result of a product you’d like to create, and the positive difference it will make in the world. Describe the world that will result as it is impacted by this product.   

Again, think of a three-word (or fewer) brand promise, (for example, “finally thin forever” or “ultimate driving machine” or “strategic defense initiative” (but don’t get stuck on this goal — just consider it — you will perfect it over time).

  • Describe in detail who would buy the product, who would use it, and who would pay for it.
  • Where would the product be sold?
  • Where would it be used?What would it look like?
  • What resources (people and things) would be required to design it, manufacture it, distribute it, operate it, support it, and maintain it?

Cue 6: Your Perfect Career or Business

Write your vision statement to clearly define your purpose for your perfect business.

“Describe your perfect business operating model, business cycle, processes, employees, customers, marketing, manufacturing, operations, service delivery, and support models. Describe the typical customer’s workday, week, month, and annual cycle, as THEY define it. Think I’m the Boss, I love my job, I do what I want, my customers are thrilled, and I make all the money I want.” 

One more time, think of a three-word (or fewer) brand promise for the core processes, services, or products delivered by the company, (such as, “we paint anything” or “high performance, delivered” or “the document company” (but don’t get stuck on this goal — just consider it for a moment).

Example Vision Statements

Review and Reinforce what You Learned

Answer these questions in writing, for the greatest benefit (download a printable form here):

  1. What did you learn in writing these that you didn’t know before?
  2. What did you learn in writing these that surprised you, or that you weren’t expecting?

Validate Your Results

You now have one or more statements, that will serve as a guide for your future practices (put these statements in your PowerBoard, notebook, drive).

Next, click here and write rules that support the life you really want

For More Information

Find your purpose in life. Clarify your purpose and align your priorities so you can confidently focus on your key priorities in every situation.
Find your purpose in life. Clarify your purpose and align your priorities so you can confidently focus on your key priorities in every situation.

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Hi, I’m Dylan Cornelius.
I was passed over for promotions four times in three years, every time passed over by a peer. My marriage was a wreck. I was obese and my doctor threatened to medicate me if I didn’t lose weight.
When I calculated the per-hour value of my overtime at work, the additional money in my bonus didn’t justify the costs to my health, relationships, and personal satisfaction.
After five years of hearing me complain, my brother told me to stop complaining or do something about it. I was stunned that it had been so long.
After a long and expensive search, I realized the quality of my relationships was poor and I wasn’t taking care of other people or myself.
When I committed to creating fantastic relationships and high-performing teams in every area of my life that mattered, my life transformed.
I was promoted. Now I’m picked to lead teams and frequently thanked for my contribution.
While my marriage didn’t survive, I met an amazing woman who trained me for my first two marathons, and now I do triathlons for fun. I lost 50 pounds and controlled my diet, allergies, and autoimmunity.
Now my “Honey Bunny” and I tour for weeks at a time on a tandem bike. Soon, we’ll cross countries and continents.
I created a Team Acceleration Blueprint based on my personal development journey and decades of education and experience building and leading teams at some of the best universities and companies on the planet.
I believe the world can work for everyone. It starts with clarity of purpose, fantastic relationships, and high-performing teams. I intend to help 10,000 people create an unfair advantage and achieve results they didn’t believe were possible too.

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